Electrical Engineering Courses

  • Introduction to engineering disciplines, problem solving, design teamwork and ethics.
     

  • Design and application of combinational logic circuits with exposure to modern methods and design tools; introduction to sequential logic circuits.

  • Solutions to engineering problems making extensive use of modern software tools such as Matlab.

  • Microprocessor system architecture, instruction sets, and interfacing; assembly language programming.

  • Application of fundamental concepts of electrical science in linear circuit analysis; mathematic models of electric components and circuits.

  • Electrical instruments; laboratory applications of electric laws; transient and steady-state responses of electrical circuits.

  • Basic DC and AC circuits

  • Fundamental device characteristics including diodes, MOSFETs and bipolar transistors; small- and large-signal characteristics and design of linear circuits.

  • Brief description: EE 321 enhances the students’ introduction to linear circuit analysis toward a systematic solution and design methodology, based on differential-equation formalisms. This general circuit analysis serves as a starting point toward an introduction to core tools in systems and signals analysis for electrical engineers.

  • Design and analysis digital systems emphasizing synchronous circuits for control, communication, and signal and data processing; use of modern CAD tools and technologies; basic system-level electronics.

  •  Fundamentals of transmission lines, electrostatics, magnetostatics, and Maxwell's equations for static fields.

  • Modern developments in digital system design, parallel structures, pipelining, input/output, high speed circuits, laboratory experience in digital system design; emphasis on CPU architecture.

  • Discrete and continuous-time signals, LTI systems, convolutions, sampling, Fourier transform, Z-Transform, filtering, DFT, amplitude and frequency modulation.

  • Maxwell's equations, plane waves, waveguides, resonators, antennas, numerical methods.

  • Experiments in electrical circuits, measurements and electronics; principles of measurements and measuring instruments.

  • Power system components including electromechanical machines, transmission lines, transformers; and introduction to power system steady state operation.

  • Practical Laboratory for understanding the components (e.g. transformers, rotating machines) of a power system through performing experiments and studies

  • Electrical engineering design of specific projects including design specification; written and oral presentations and reports.

  • Electrical engineering design of specific open-ended projects including design specifications; written and oral presentations and reports.

  • The study of the operation and design of wireless communication circuit components from the perspective of the radio frequency. These include high speed circuits for telecommunications including filters, mixers, amplifiers, oscillators and transceivers. Also includes the study of the characteristics of these subsystems which set the ultimate limits on the performance of wireless communication systems.

  • System and radio propagation issues for wireless telecommunications. Cellular, PCS, microwave, and satellite system analysis, design, measurement and testing.

  • ASIC architectures and design methods; digital systems and circuits; system test methods.

  • Digital communication techniques; performance of digital communication systems in noise; matched filter detection; quantization. Cooperative course taught jointly by WSU and UI (EE 404).

  • Concepts and implementation of computer networks; architectures, protocol layers, internetworking and addressing case studies.

  • Discrete and fast Fourier transforms; Z-transform; sampling; discrete convolution; digital filter design; effects of quantization.

  • Modern developments in digital system design, parallel structures, pipelining, input/output, high speed circuits, laboratory experience in digital system design.
     

  • Fundamentals of biological sciences and biotechnology for engineers and computer scientists

  • Analysis and design of analog integrated circuits in CMOS and BiCMOS technologies; current mirrors, gain stages, operational amplifiers, frequency response, and compensation.

  • Test and characterization of analog and mixed-signal ICs including the computer-aided design of analog ICs and printed circuit board test fixtures; emphasis on design documentation and reporting.

  • Current topics in electrical engineering and computer engineering.

  • High power semiconductor devices; analysis and design of linear and switching power supplies, high frequency magnetics, controller design.

  • EE 489 provides an introduction to classical control theory. Building on students’ background in modeling and analyzing electrical systems, this course will study how dynamical systems can be controlled (modified) through feedback, so that they achieve desired design goals.  Throughout the course, these control methods will be applied to realistic examples from several disciplines.

  • Static and dynamic behavior of power systems, power flow, and economic considerations.

  • Renewable energy resources, wind energy, fuel cells, solar cells and modules, stand alone and grid connected PV system design, experiments on PV system components, fuel cells and wind turbines.

  • Analysis and equipment fundamentals of power system protection; symmetrical components, fault calculations; fuses; and relays including burden calculations.

  • Experiments and measurements of protective relay equipment under test, simulated fault and fault conditions.

  • Equilibrium statistics of electrons and holes; carrier dynamics; p-n junctions, metal-semiconductor junctions, BJTs, MOSFETs, LEDs, Fabrication processes.

  • May be repeated for credit. S, F grading. Variable credit (1-4)

To Engineer is Human

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