Electrical Engineering Scholarships

Scholarships for Electrical Engineering majors

Clyde Harry Backus Student Loan
Dick Baker Endowed Memorial Scholarship
A.L. and Erma Betts Endowed Scholarship
Homer J. Dana Endowed Memorial Fund
Mahmoud M. Dillsi Family Graduate Fellowship
James Ewing Scholarship
David F. Fox Endowed Memorial Scholarship
Harold and Diana Frank Endowed Fellowship
Thomas A. Goodwin Sr. Memorial Scholarship
Eugene Gochnauer Scholarship and Science Endowment Fund
Richard D. Harbour Endowed Memorial Scholarship
Chin Shung Hsu Memorial Scholarship
Johnson Electrical Engineering Endowed Scholarship
Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation Scholarship
Angela Lengas And George Lengas Endowed Fellowship
Clifford C. Mosher Endowed Excellence Fund
Claude & Patricia Munsell Endowed Scholarship
E. Allen & Helen L. Phillips Endowed Scholarship
The Max and Janet Ramble Annual Scholarship
David H. Schrader Endowed Scholarship
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Endowed Graduate Fellowship
The Royal D. and Jeannette Morris Sloan Scholarship

 


Clyde Harry Backus Endowed Student Loan Fund

Background

The late Clyde Harry Backus was a 1925 WSU graduate in hydroelectric engineering. He spent his career working in various parts of the United States for RCA, retiring in 1966. Mr Backus died in 1969. His sister, the late Joyce Backus, established the loan fund in his memory as a part of her estate.

Uses and Purposes

The Clyde Harry Backus Student Loan Fund is used to assist undergraduate students of high achievement enrolled in degree programs in the field of electrical engineering or related sciences. Preference shall be given to American Indians and graduates of Washington State Public High Schools.

Recipients accepting a Backus loan assume the obligation to repay it within 10 years following graduation.

Dick Baker Endowed Memorial Scholarship

Background

A truly memorable era in the history of the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science came to a close with the passing in April 1998 of Professor Richard A. "Dick" Baker, a 1956 alumnus of Washington State University and a member of the faculty for more than 35 years.

With his ready wit and caring heart, Dr. Baker touched the lives of thousands, both in and out of our EE classrooms. His life and the rapport he developed with his classes demonstrated the importance of students in his life.

Dr. Baker’s special interest was in power systems, and specifically the protection and control of high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) transmission.

One of his famous “Bakerisms:” “Anything not covered sufficiently in lecture, and not sufficiently covered in the text, will be sufficiently covered in the exam.”

Uses and Purposes

The income from this fund is used to award one or more scholarships to WSU students, with preference to electrical engineering majors specializing in power engineering.

 

A.L. and Erma Betts Endowed Scholarship in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Background

A.L. “Attie” Betts was on the engineering faculty from 1955 to 1978, serving 15 years as chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering, whose name changed to Electrical and Computer Engineering. He passed away Nov. 4, 2000, at the age of 84. He and Erma married in 1940.

After serving in World War II, he taught at Oklahoma A&M, then earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering, physics, and applied mathematics from the University of Texas in 1952 and came to Washington State College in 1952.

With Dr. Eugene Greenfield, director of WSU’s engineering research division, Dr. Betts was involved in high-voltage testing of transmission lines for the Electric Power Research and Development Center near Grand Coulee Dam. Other research included studies of electrical grounding, radio frequency utilization, and underground distribution of electrical programs.

In the 1970s, he directed a program to retain aerospace engineers for the field of power engineering. He also helped establish WSU’s annual Western Protective Relay Conference and served as chair of the Spokane section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE).

Uses and Purposes

The income from this fund shall be used to award one or more scholarships to qualified WSU students with a major in electrical engineering, computer engineering, or computer science, with selection to be determined by established procedures that consider both merit and financial need.

 

Homer J. Dana Endowed Memorial Fund

Background

Homer Jackson Dana was born in 1890, the same year as the Washington State Agricultural College and School of Science, his alma mater and the birthplace of his inventions. He served for over 40 years as one of the most productive and versatile research engineers in the country.

Dana earned bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering at WSC in 1915 and 1917, respectively. In 1919 he became the first full-time engineer for the newly established Engineering Experiment Station at the college. He completed a professional degree in mechanical engineering in 1922, became assistant director of the Experiment Station in 1929, and director in 1942. He was a founder and well-loved, long-time advisor to the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity.

Former colleagues say Dana could work on multiple projects and still keep his suit and tie clean. When he retired in 1960, he had acquired patents for spark-free electrostatic recording paper for use in facsimile transmissions, a prototype home freezer, an emotional stress meter (lie detector), and a catenary warning light system to help aircraft avoid high voltage transmission lines, to name just a few examples.

Dana and Hubert V. Carpenter founded one the first educational radio stations in the United States. It went on the air in Pullman in 1922 as KFAE, changed its name to KWSC in 1926, and to KWSU in 1969.

Uses and Purposes

Recipients shall be regularly enrolled undergraduates or graduate students in electrical engineering or mechanical engineering, with an accumulated grade point average at least equal to the average of all students in these departments.

In the case of graduate students employed as teaching assistants or research assistants who are enrolled on a half-time or greater basis in academic courses, such employment-study combination shall be counted as full time academic work.

Scholarships shall be based 75 percent on demonstrated practical engineering ability and 25 percent on financial need.

 

Mahmoud M. Dillsi Family Graduate Fellowship

Background

Mac Dillsi’s life at Washington State College began in 1954 as a new immigrant from the Middle East. The hope he felt and the determination now driving him to exercise his potential through an engineering career, fueled by higher education in America, was an exhilarating contrast to the periods of despair he had experienced as a refugee in Syria during the first Arab-Israeli war in 1948. That war had torn apart his family and destroyed the wealth and security he had enjoyed as a child.

Mac’s teachers all recognized his abilities early, but he credits both his friends in Ferry Hall and WSC’s electrical engineering chair, A.L. Betts, for motivating him to persist in his studies through bachelor’s and master’s degrees.

His checkered career included both university teaching and professional experience. He worked in Lebanon, Libya, and Saudi Arabia in a variety of positions. In the United States, most of his work was in the states of Washington, California and Texas in organizations that included Bechtel, Boeing, the Bonneville Power Administration, NASA, the University of Pacific, VECTRA GSI, and Columbia Energy and Environmental Services.

Mac says he owes his successful engineering career in large part to the start he got at Washington State University. It was an easy decision to help “pay back” with an endowed fund to assist graduate students in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Uses and Purposes

Distributions from this Fund shall be used to award one or more fellowships to graduate students in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science according to the following criteria:

  • Preference for residents of the State of Washington
  • Demonstrated financial need

 

James Ewing Scholarship

Background

James M. Ewing graduated from WSU with a degree in electrical engineering in 1978. He grew up in Seattle and graduated from Queen Anne High School in 1960.

Although Jim was the best math and science student in his high-school graduating class, earned high grades, and wanted to be a scientist or engineer from the time he was a kid, poverty and other factors delayed his education for many years.

Jim believes that all people should have the opportunity to obtain an education commensurate with their abilities and desires regardless of family circumstances.

Mr. Ewing contributes annually to this scholarship and has made provision in his will to endow the scholarship upon his death.

Uses and Purposes

The proceeds from this fund provide scholarships to qualified undergraduate and graduate students in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Recipients shall be selected from students whose family income is below the median family income in the state of Washington at the time they are attending WSU.

Recipients shall have maintained a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 (out of a possible 4.0) at WSU. Students who have not yet completed a semester at WSU shall have maintained a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (out of a possible 4.0) in high school or the previous college or community college they have attended.

David F. Fox Endowed Memorial Scholarship

Background

This Fund was established by David Fox’s parents from a bequest in David’s own will. David’s interest in electrical engineering started in junior high school and continued until his death at the age of 29 from cancer. He was a “hands-on” engineer whose interest in electronics was sparked by doing projects out of trade magazines, assembling Heath Kits and building hi-fi audio equipment. He even designed and built an electronic toy that won an award at WSU.

David felt his life was significantly enhanced because of the challenges and rewards of his electrical engineering involvement.

He graduated from WSU with a BSEE in February 1982. He worked for Westmar in Seattle from 1982 to 1984 and for the Marine Division of Honeywell from 1984 until his death in December of 1987.

Besides electronics, he loved sailing, hiking, playing his drum set, music and scuba diving. At WSU, he was a member of Kappa Sigma Fraternity and ran in the first Apple Cup Run in 1979.

Uses and Purposes

This scholarship fund was established to perpetuate support for young men and women interested in electrical engineering and its related branches.

It is the intent of this memorial fund to enable others to perpetuate a similar rewarding life through the assistance this fund provides.

The Endowment is also intended to add strength and stature to the School of EECS by providing the ability to recruit talented students interested in electrical engineering.

 

Harold and Diana Frank Endowed Fellowship in Electrical Engineering

Background

Harold R. Frank graduated from Washington State University in Electrical Engineering in 1948. One of the pioneering entrepreneurs who graduated from the College of Engineering and Architecture, he started Applied Magnetics Corporation in his home in 1957. Under his leadership, the company went on to become the largest independent manufacturer of magnetic heads for the data storage segment of the computer industry. Throughout his career, he continued as a leader in his industry and his community.

Harold is a 1990 recipient of a WSU Alumni Achievement Award.

During Campaign WSU, Harold and Diana Frank completed funding for the Harold Frank Electrical Engineering Fellowship in the school of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

(The Franks also created an endowed scholarship fund for students in any engineering or computer science discipline, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Harold’s Graduation from WSU. It was their wish to create a legacy to help young people in engineering and computer science benefit from a WSU education.)

Uses and Purposes

The Harold and Diana Frank Electrical Engineering Fellowship fund was established to support a highly capable graduate student in the School of EECS.

Thomas A. Goodwin Sr. Memorial Scholarship in Electrical Engineering

Background

Thomas A. Goodwin Sr. graduated from Washington State University in 1959 with a degree in electrical engineering. He then worked as an electrical engineer for Grant, Chelan, and Lewis County Public Utility Districts until 1967, when he accepted a position with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation at Grand Coulee Dam.

After retiring in 1980, he established Northwest Consulting Services to provide technical advice to electrical power producers.

Until his death in 1998, he provided his technical expertise in the diagnosis and maintenance of electrical generating facilities throughout North America, South America, and Europe.

Before entering college, he served four years in the United States Navy during the Korean War. In 1953, he married Alice Harmon, at that time a WAVE in the Navy.

The Goodwins raised six children, five of whom earned degrees at WSU.

Uses and Purposes

Income from this endowment shall be awarded to seniors specializing in power engineering.

The intent is to reward students who have shown both promise and persistence by helping them finish their degrees. The award may be for one or two years, as needed to complete a B.S. degree.

 

Eugene Gochnauer Scholarship and Science Endowment Fund

Background

Eugene L. Gochnauer graduated from Washington State College in 1934 with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. A gifted student, he also participated in athletics and in the drum and bugle corps as a percussionist. He served in the Army ROTC program under student Colonel Edward R. Murrow.

Eugene enjoyed a successful career as a hydroelectric engineer, working on several dams in the Northwest: Grand Coulee in Washington, Fort Peck and Hungry Horse in Montana, and Anderson Ranch in Idaho.

In 1959, he began his work on the construction of the New York State Power Authority Niagara Hydroelectric Project, and eventually became resident manager of the project. He retired in 1979.

Through this endowment, Eugene hopes to continue to encourage and assist youngsters and early graduates to continue their studies and work to develop sources of energy (electrical) that do not depend on depletable oil or coal.

At 93, Eugene retains his interest in science through his continued membership as a senior life member of the IEEE.

Uses and Purposes

The income from this fund shall be used to provide one or more undergraduate scholarships and/or graduate fellowships to students pursuing a degree in electrical engineering, and/or to support scientific research in the development of sources of energy (electric) that do not depend on depletable oil or coal.

 

Richard D. Harbour Endowed Memorial Scholarship

Background

The late Richard D. Harbour, a WSU alumnus and faculty member in electrical engineering for 22 years, was born in Rosalia, Washington, where he attended Rosalia public schools. He enrolled in Washington State College intermittently over a period of 12 years, from 1938 to 1950, serving on several student committees including the War and Servicemen’s committee, the student branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineering, and the Amateur Radio Club.

As a charter member of the Independent Men’s Association, he helped coordinate on-campus housing for men students not affiliated with fraternities. He was also a member of the Reserve Officers Training Corps. He left WSU to enter active duty in June of 1943, earning the rank of Second Lieutenant. As a member of the Army Signal Corps, he was stationed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he primarily wrote patents for the Signal Patent Agency. He married June Harbour in 1944 and was discharged from the Army in 1946. Seven of their nine children earned bachelor’s degrees at WSU, another earned a master’s, and one died in childhood.

Richard earned a BSEE in 1947 and MSEE in 1950. He served on the faculty from the summer of 1950 until his death November 23, 1972.

Uses and Purposes

Recipients must be regularly enrolled undergraduate students showing special interest in electrical engineering.

Scholarships shall be awarded on the basis of financial need and academic achievement.

Chin Shung Hsu Memorial Scholarship in Electrical Engineering

Background

The late Chin Shung Hsu brought enthusiasm, humor, and great knowledge to the courses he taught, endearing him to his peers as well as his students. He served on the electrical engineering faculty from 1980 until his death in 2001. He is survived by his wife Ning, son Albert, and daughter Jessica.

Dr. Hsu came to the United States in 1972 from Taiwan, after receiving his bachelor’s degree in electronic engineering from National Chiao Tung University in 1970 and serving in the Chinese Air Force as an officer of electronics and radar systems. He earned a master’s degree in electrical engineering at Utah State University, then a Ph.D. from Oregon State University in 1979. From 1985 through 1988, he served as a consultant and research engineer at the Boeing Company’s Commercial Airplanes division.

He had a variety of research interests related to control systems and served one summer as a summer research fellow and one year as a visiting scientist in the Flight Dynamics Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio.

He was a leader in the Palouse Asian American Association and a senior member in the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He was also named an honorary member of WSU’s Association for Faculty Women.

Uses and Purposes

The income from this fund shall be used to award undergraduate scholarships in electrical engineering for third-year students enrolled in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Selection will be determined by established procedures that consider both merit and financial need.

Preference in awarding both new and renewed scholarships will be for students who have at least a 3.0 overall GPA.

 

Johnson Electrical Engineering Endowed Scholarship

Background

The Johnson Electrical Engineering Scholarship Fund was established in honor of Ernest Eldon Johnson, a 1922 graduate of Washington State University. Mr. Johnson was a member of Beta Theta Pi and participated in the Army ROTC while a student here.

Uses and Purposes

Income earned from this account shall be awarded to one or more deserving students enrolled in the graduate program of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The department will notify the heirs of Mr. Johnson of the recipient so that they might be aware of the value of Mr. Johnson’s gift of endowment.

 

Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation Scholarship

Background

Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corporation, a leading producer of fabricated aluminum products, alumina, and primary aluminum, has established a Kaiser Aluminum Scholarship with WSU’s School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

This award provides for one or more annual scholarships or fellowships for deserving students pursuing academic disciplines aligned with the interests of the corporation.

Uses and Purposes

To be selected for the awards, students must have demonstrated a high degree of merit and promise, and in making the selection, the University shall give preference to qualified minority students.

Following the selection of students for these awards, Kaiser shall be supplied with the name and pertinent information regarding each Kaiser Scholar or Fellow as well as the opportunity to meet with the recipient and present an award certificate.

 

Angela Lengas And George Lengas Endowed Fellowship

Background

This fund was established with a generous bequest from the George Lengas estate in memory of his beloved sister, Angela. Mr. Lengas passed away in October 2000, in London, England.

Mr. Lengas was born in Tanganyika in 1930. He came to the United States in the early 1950s and received a bachelor of science in engineering physics from Washington State University in 1957, paying tuition and fees with earnings from a part-time job and saving money on lodging by living with an aunt. He interrupted his studies with service in the U.S. Army during the Korean War.

After graduating, he worked for McDonnell Douglas, completed a year of graduate study in radioisotope technology at the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies in Tennessee, and he rejoined his family in Kenya. to work on a variety of electrical engineering projects for the municipality of Nairobi and manage a coffee estate. He returned to the United States in 1974, after working for the Public Electricity Company of Greece for a year. He moved to the Tri-Cities in 1976 to work for Vitro Engineering at the Hanford Project.

He received his MSEE from WSU in Pullman in 1983. He spent 35 years in the design, construction and management of large power systems engineering projects and large-scale industrial, nuclear and chemical process (waste-treatment) facilities. In all, he spent 19 years on the Hanford Project, advancing to senior consulting and senior manager for the chemical process and nuclear reactor project management divisions. His last assignment at Hanford was managing the restructuring effort to privatize the various utility services. He retired in 1994. He also co-founded the Saint Nectarios Orthodox Church in the Tri-Cities.

Uses and Purposes

The income from this fund is used to assist WSU students pursuing a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (MSEE), without regard to sex, race, color, creed or immigration (resident) status. Recipients must maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average.

 

Clifford C. Mosher Endowed Excellence Fund

Background

Clifford Mosher’s career in electrical engineering began in the United States Navy, where he served as an electronics instructor from 1945 to 1949. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1965. He worked the following year at the University of Missouri, and the year after that at the Edison Electric Institute.

He then served on the faculty of Drexel University until joining WSU as a professor of power systems engineering in 1973.

Dr. Mosher’s special interest is in relay protection, design of high-voltage laboratory equipment, distribution system losses, and reliability. In 1992, he received the Faculty Service Award from the Conferences and Institutes Division of the National University Continuing Education Association for his role in developing and coordinating major WSU conferences, including the Western Protective Relay Conference.

The School of EECS established the Clifford C. Mosher Excellence Fund upon his retirement. It has been augmented with donations from alumni spearheaded by Dr. Mosher’s former student Hardev Juj of Seattle City Light.

Uses And Purposes

This Fund shall be used

  • to award undergraduate and graduate scholarships to students in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science with preference given to students emphasizing power engineering.
  • for other purposes which will enhance programs in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, including course development, faculty development, and student projects.

Claude & Patricia Munsell Endowed Scholarship

Background

Claude Munsell is a 1949 graduate in electrical engineering, and Patricia is a former engineering student. The Munsells have been steady donors to Washington State University for more than two dozen consecutive years, providing unrestricted, programmatic, and scholarship support. Claude served as a WSU Foundation Trustee and Trustee Ambassador intermittently from 1980 to 1999. While at WSU, Claude was a member of Sigma Nu and Army ROTC. He was also subsidiary president of .GTE Northwest in Everett, which later became Verizon. He retired in 1991 and lives in Leavenworth, Washington.

Uses and Purposes

This fund provides support for third- or fourth-year students majoring in electrical engineering, with specialization in communications. Students must have a 3.0 or better GPA and a demonstrated financial need.

 

E. Allen & Helen L. Phillips Endowed Scholarship

Background

The scholarship was established with a 1992 gift from the late E. Allen Phillips, a 1924 graduate in electrical engineering, and his wife Helen L. Phillips.

As a student, Mr. Phillips participated in Phi Sigma Kappa and the ROTC.

At the end of his career, he was a structural engineer in the firm Phillips and George in Napa, California, from 1987 to his death in 1995.

Uses and Purposes

The fund provides scholarships for juniors or seniors; with preference for those majoring in electrical engineering. Selection is by a committee appointed by dean, with participation from the chair of EECS.

 

The Max and Janet Ramble Annual Scholarship in Electrical Engineering

Background

Kenneth "Max" Ramble is a Colville, Washington, native and a 1970 graduate in electrical engineering. Max has recently retired from a very successful career with Hewlett-Packard and Agilent (following the HP-Agilent split). He attributes much of his professional success to his WSU education, with special appreciation for the teaching of the late Dr. Harriet Rigas, chair of electrical and computer engineering when he was a student.

Janet Ramble grew up in Spokane, graduated from Whitman College and had a career as executive director for the Washington State Auto Dealers’ Association.
The Rambles’ retirement activities have included extensive domestic travel, hiking, bicycling, and classes to enhance their enjoyment of their hobbies.

Max and Janet have made provision through their will to endow the Max and Janet Ramble Scholarship upon their death. Meanwhile, they contribute annually to a scholarship of the same name, which provides financial assistance to currently enrolled electrical engineering students in need and deserving of scholarships.

Uses and Purposes

Recipients will be majoring in electrical engineering at the junior or senior level in their academic career. The scholarship selection committee decides annually, according to circumstances, whether the total contributions to the Ramble scholarship in any one year should be awarded as one lump sum to one student or in multiple disbursements to more than one student.

The Rambles’ annual stock gift was generously matched by HP, later Agilent, before Max’s retirement in 2003.

David H. Schrader Endowed Scholarship in Electrical Engineering

Background

David Schrader served 32 years, from 1963 to 1995 as a faculty member in electrical engineering, teaching courses primarily in the field of electromagnetics. His research focused on ionospheric propagation, microwave heating, and other areas of electromagnetics.

Dr. Schrader is the author of a textbook called “Microstrip Circuit Design,” published in 1995, for upper-level and graduate electrical engineer students and practicing electrical engineers working in microwave circuit design.

Dr. Schrader’s industrial experience included working for four years as an electrical engineer for Hazeltine Electronics.

Maintaining his residence outside Albion, Washington, he has been active in the WSU Retirees Association. The endowed scholarship fund was created upon his retirement.

Uses and Purposes

The income from this fund shall be used to award one or more scholarships to qualified WSU students with a major in electrical engineering, with selection to be determined by established procedures that consider both merit and financial need.

 

Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Endowed Graduate Fellowship

Background

Co-founded by 1977 Ph.D. graduate Edmond O. Schweitzer, Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories has a long relationship with Washington State University as a spin-off of Dr. Schweitzer’s graduate research, as a corporate donor, and as a valued local resource for faculty consultation, internship and employment opportunities, project collaboration, and membership in the Power Professorship industry-university consortium.

Dr. Schweitzer’s own career as both a university faculty member and company founder, CEO, and president provides a superior model for engineering students aspiring to be entrepreneurs.

Dr. Schweitzer’s achievements in research, teaching, and innovation in the power industry are recognized globally. His long list of accomplishments and awards culminated recently with his induction into the National Academy of Engineering, the highest honor attainable for a professional engineer.

Uses and Purposes

This fellowship was initiated to provide financial assistance for graduate students in electrical engineering with an emphasis in power systems engineering.

The fellowship is restricted to U.S. citizens.

 

The Royal D. and Jeannette Morris Sloan Scholarship in Electrical Engineering

Background

Royal D. Sloan joined the engineering faculty in 1923, advancing to professor and vice-dean of the College of Engineering. In 1936, he left for MIT for a second master's degree and then in 1942 became the second dean of WSC’s engineering college.

1944 alumna Jean Converse Sharp remembers that "despite the unprecedented changes the war years brought to the WSC engineering programs, Professor Sloan encouraged us to continue on for our degrees, including me, a woman studying engineering. He would always personally help his students in finding solutions to technical and career problems, and always welcomed visits and letters from former students."

During his deanship, the divisions of Industrial Research and Industrial Services and their parent unit, the Washington State Institute of Technology, were established. In 1950, he took on added responsibilities as vice-director of the institute. He left his dual positions in 1956, but taught until he retired in 1960. Sloan Hall was named for Dean Sloan in 1962 and now contains many classrooms and laboratories used by students in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Dean Sloan was married to Jeannette Morris Sloan, enjoying a happy and supportive marriage for about 50 years, until Jeannette’s death in 1969. The dean died in 1979.

The Sloan Scholarship grew out of contributions from alumni, friends, and the Sloans’ son R. Daniel Sloan.

Uses and Purposes

The preferred use is for financial aid for undergraduate students majoring in electrical engineering. It may also be used for students’ design projects, research, or travel.

To Engineer is Human

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